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10 Brain-Healthy Foods That Will Boost Concentration and Memory

10 Brain-Healthy Foods That Will Boost Concentration and Memory

Being a student comes with big responsibilities and being able to concentrate while studying for a big exam is vital.

Here are 10 brain-healthy foods that will boost concentration and memory.

1. Avocados

The healthy fats found in avocados boost brain function by helping promote better blood flow. Blood flow to all your organs is essential for them to function at their best. Avocados are also high in fiber which means it will help slow down your digestion and keep away hunger pangs that could distract you.

2. Coconut oil

Coconut oil is a natural anti-inflammatory agent and can work to suppress cells responsible for inflammation in your brains. This will help boost your memory and prevent memory loss as you age.

3. Leafy green vegetables

Popeye wasn’t just chowing down spinach to boost his strength. Turns out, he was boosting his brain power too. Spinach and most other leafy green vegetables are full of antioxidants and B-vitamins which help boost memory, focus and overall brain health. They are also a good source of folic acid which helps boost mental clarity.

4. Olive oil

Olive oil is high in the antioxidant polyphenol. Antioxidants will help prevent cognitive decline as you age. It is also high in vitamins E and K which together help maintain brain productivity and boost processing speed. Olive oil also boosts the levels of brain chemicals which stimulate the formation of new brain cells.

5. Dark chocolate

Dark chocolate is often praised for its high level of flavonoids, which is a good antioxidant. It also helps lower blood pressure and improve blood flow to the brain. However, make sure you choose the right brand of dark chocolate to absorb these benefits. Many store brands contain large amounts of sugar that could do more harm than good to your brain.

6. Salmon, sardines and other fatty fish

There’s a reason fish oil capsules are such a popular health supplement. Fatty fish such as salmon and sardines contain essential omega-3 fatty acids which are vital for brain function. It also protects your brain from declined cognitive functions and memory loss as you age.

7. Nuts

Nuts are rich in antioxidants, essential fats and amino acids that have been proven to help you focus. Walnuts are likely your best option as they contain the most amount of antioxidants compared to other nuts. Walnuts also contain alpha-linolenic acid, which is an omega-3 fatty acid that promotes brain development and health. To get these benefits, just one ounce of nuts a day is sufficient.

8. Blueberries

One of the most antioxidant-rich foods you could eat, blueberries are the perfect supplement for a healthy brain. They are also high in gallic acid, which prevents damage to your brain from large amounts of stress.

9. Eggs

Eggs contain choline, which is vital for brain development. A large intake of choline is also correlated with improved cognitive performance. Make sure you eat the yolks too as they contain the most amount of choline!

10. Oatmeal

Oatmeal is often touted as one of the healthiest breakfast options. A good serving of oatmeal in the morning leaves you feeling full and prevents midday hunger pangs. Oatmeal also has a low glycemic index, which means it won’t spike blood sugar levels. This will help increase brain functionality. For a particularly brain-healthy breakfast, try opting for a bowl of slow-cooked oatmeal topped with a variety of nuts and blueberries.

 

Source: greatbigminds.com

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We all have to deal with stress at certain times in our lives, and at some times it can be worse than others. Studying can be very stressful for a lot of people, and this stress can be even worse if studying abroad. Not only are we more likely to get stressed out when studying abroad, but it can be harder to deal with too, with family and friends a long way away and potentially even in very different time zones. But don’t despair, because there are ways of coping with stress before it all becomes too overwhelming.

Organised means less stressed

The best thing that you can do to keep stress at a manageable level is to be organized and plan everything in advance. If you know what you have coming up in the week ahead then you’re less likely to get behind, or suddenly remember something you’d forgotten at the last minute and have a big panic about it (or, even worse, completely forget something and not show up or hand in an assignment, leading to more stress about said lapse in memory).

It's time for rest!

You also need to make sure that you have some down time. All work and no play make Jack an incredibly stressed-out student. Join a few societies and sports clubs, both at your college and out in the community, so you meet a range of people. Not only will this give you some time off from thinking about your studies, but also give you the opportunity to make some new friends, who you may need around when you’re not feeling so good. You will also have opportunities for further social gatherings with your new friends; if you’re invited for a party, then go for it! You definitely need some time off.

Stay in touch!

Although it’s important to make new friends, do keep in touch with good friends from home and, of course, your family. If calling and texting is expensive, try and schedule chats over the Internet, as this is free and easy provided you have an Internet connection. Try and schedule a weekly online meeting with the most important person in your life (be it a parent, sibling, best friend or someone else) so you have that chat to look forward to all week. If you don’t have it scheduled then you might find that it hardly ever happens, especially if you’re in different time zones. Chances are, this person will be missing you just as much as you miss them, so they will be able to sympathize with you.

No for Nostalgia!

On the other hand, you shouldn’t obsess over your life back home. Constant messages and calls from a loved one could just make you feel very homesick and depressed, and you ultimately want to enjoy your time studying abroad and experience a new culture, not try and live your old life vicariously through a family member or friend. Try and get the best of both worlds, because coping with stress while studying abroad is all about getting the balance right in every possible way.
Source: hotcoursesabroad.com
How to cope with stress when studying abroad.
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10 Habits Of Successful Students

10 Habits Of Successful Students

  1. Get Organized. Making a plan for what you’re going to do and when you’re going to do it will make sure you’re always ahead of the curve – literally.
  2. Don’t multitask. Studies have shown that multitasking is physically impossible.
  3. Divide it up. Studying isn’t fun to begin with, and forcing yourself through a study marathon will only make it worse. Dividing your work into manageable chunks and rewarding yourself when you finish each chunk will make studying (more) fun.
  4. Sleep. Don’t underestimate the importance of those eight hours of zzz’s every night! Getting a good night’s rest will sharpen your focus and improve your working memory.
  5. Set a schedule. Do you work better right after school or after you’ve eaten dinner? Are you more productive in 90-minute blocks or half-hour spurts? Find a schedule that works for you, and stick to it.
  6. Take notes. Taking notes will not only keep you more engaged during class, but will also help you narrow down what you need to study when exam time rolls around. It’s much easier to reread your notes than to reread your entire textbook!
  7. Study. This one might be obvious, but did you know that there’s a right and a wrong way to study? Review your material several days ahead of time, in small chunks, and in different manners (for example, write flashcards one day and take practice tests the next). In other words, don’t cram.
  8. Manage your study space. Find a place that will maximize your productivity. Look for places away from the television and other distractions. Whether it’s your local library or just the desk in your bedroom, set aside a study space that you’ll want to spend time in.
  9. Find a study group. Sitting down with a group of people who are learning the same things as you is a great way to go over confusing class material or prepare for a big test. You can quiz each other, reteach material, and make sure that everyone is on the same page. After all, teaching someone else is the best way to learn.
  10. Ask questions. You’re in school to learn, so don’t be afraid to do just that! Asking for help – from a teacher, a tutor or your friends – is a surefire way to make sure you truly understand the material.

Source: Opportunity.org

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Fun Facts: 10 Reasons To Study Abroad

Fun Facts: 10 Reasons To Study Abroad

There are hundreds of reasons why you should study abroad. Kaplan thought that writing each one would be too hard. We decided to list the top ten reasons instead.

1. Making Friends

Studying abroad might seem scary but it is a great opportunity to make new friends. You why study abroadwill meet people from different countries who are doing the same thing. Sharing your experience with them will create friendships that can last forever.

2. Gaining Confidence

Traveling to a different country to study takes courage. You will do things that you have never done before. Succeeding at new challenges will give you extra confidence and turn you into a stronger person.

3. Becoming Independent

Some people might not be used to do things for themselves. Studying abroad makes you learn to look after yourself without the help of family. Gaining greater independence will help you to achieve more in life.

4. Food

Why study abroad? For food of course! Every country has amazing local dishes. If you travel abroad to the UK, you can try a delicious plate of fish and chips. Students in the USA can enjoy mouth-watering hot dogs. Nothing beats a barbeque in sunny Australia.

5. Make People Jealous

Friends back home will be very jealous of your adventures abroad. Posting Facebook photos and Twitter updates will show everyone how much of a great time you are having. This leads nicely into the next reason to study abroad …

6. Invite Your Friends To Visit

People will love to visit if you are studying abroad. You will be able to show friends around a new country and feel like a native. Friends will also be very impressed with your new confidence and independence.

7. Improve Your C.V.

Studying abroad looks fantastic on your C.V. Employers often look for confident people who

why study abroad

have done interesting things. Showing that you have studied abroad will improve your chances of getting a job.

8. Experience New Cultures

Traveling allows you to learn about the local art, history and culture of a new country. Discover exciting and unusual customs that will amaze you. Living with a host family is a great way to learn about local traditions.

9. Record Your Experience

Studying abroad is a great reason to start a blog. Keeping a blog or a journal will help you record and share your experiences. Look back at the start of your journey and see how much progress you have made.

10. Learn Languages

The last and probably most important reason to study abroad is that it is much easier to learn the local language. Living and studying in a country makes learning a language quicker. You might even pick up the local accent.

Source: kaplaninternational.com

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Preparing For The New Academic Year

Preparing For The New Academic Year

As the summer holidays draw to a close, you might be excited about a new year or dreading the early wake-ups. Either way, it’s a good idea to start your preparations early. While you may be tempted to ‘stick your head in the sand’ and try to forget about the fast-approaching first week back, there are a few simple things you can do to ease yourself back into your studies and prepare for the year ahead.

Set some goals

Before you begin the new semester, you should set some goals to work towards over the course of the year. Try to set goals that you can realistically achieve and consider what you can improve on from the previous year. You might want to achieve a certain grade, get better at completing work on time, organise work experience or make more of an effort to make new friends.

Complete administrative tasks

While most students avoid going back to campus until they have to, organising administrative matters (such as student and public transport concession cards) ahead of time will help you beat the long queues in week one. Arranging your textbooks and course materials during the holidays also allows you time to source second-hand books or scope out prices online. If you have access to subject guides, you can start noting down assessment due dates and planning for busy periods in advance.

Think about ways to expand your learning opportunities

The holidays are a good time to start thinking about how you can build your skills outside of the classroom — before assessments start to pile up and your free time becomes an issue. You may decide to research potential internship and volunteering opportunities or ways to get involved on campus. Also consider refreshing your résumé, adding any skills or experience you’ve gained since the last update.

Organise your study space

The simple act of clearing and tidying your study area, as well as sourcing new stationery and supplies, is a great way to ease yourself back into study mode and motivate you for the year ahead. After all, with the effort you’ve gone to, you’ll want to make use of your new space.

Plan a budget and save some money

While the summer break provides ample time for work — and the chance to move back home for students living on campus — earning and saving money during the semester can prove challenging. If you’re preparing to live on a student budget, now is a great time to start planning for the months ahead. You may also consider picking up some extra hours at work before classes start — you’ll have a little extra spending money for the semester.

 

Source: gooduniversitiesguide.com.au

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