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10 things to do after exams

10 things to do after exams

1 ) Sleep: I usually come home from an exam and jump into bed to catch up on my lost sleep. The couple of days before my exam I find it difficult to get to sleep because of the looming exam but after my exams are finished, I need that period of rest to recuperate from the stressful exam period!

2 ) Go for a celebratory meal: This is something that gets me through many long periods of revision. The thought of going somewhere nice to eat and just having a generally pleasant meal and having a fun time with friends without that nagging feeling of having to revise at the back of my mind is a welcome end to revision and exams.

3 ) Pack/throw away notes: This is very satisfying. Its something that I almost see as a ritual. Packing away revision notes and folders full of lecture notes somewhere under my bed or in a dark cupboard somewhere is very satisfying indeed. And it is refreshing to wake up to an empty desk rather than one full of piles of paper and notes.

4 ) Catch up with my emails/Facebook: I try to restrict my social life as much as possible during exam period so I don’t get distracted whilst I am revising. This usually results in long lists of emails and Facebook posts needing to be read which I end up replying to very late!

5 ) Clean my room: I’m normally a very tidy person but during the exam period I don’t know what happens but I end up with clothes on the floor, my cupboard a tip and papers scattered around my room. However, its only when my exams finish that I see this mess and so clean it up. During exams its like I have beer goggles on and my eyes just skim over it all!

6 ) Make something yummy to eat: I love to bake cookies and cakes and the majority of the time they turn out to be quiet nice! I don’t get much time in between revision to bake something, and I’m usually so distracted that I end up adding the wrong quantities of ingredients so my final product is barely edible! After my exams are over, I enjoy baking something and then eating it whilst I relax.

7 ) Read a book: I have yet to find a book to read this time round. I love reading fiction, especially since it makes a nice break from all the textbooks and journals I have read throughout the year. Anyone have any recommendations?

8 ) Lounge about without feeling guilty: This always gives me a wonderful feeling! I can sleep in, relax in the sun and surf the internet for hours on end without that nagging thought of looming deadlines and exams.

9 ) Return my textbooks to the library and secretly feel smug about others still having exams: Ah its always great fun to watch my textbooks being carried away on the conveyor belt of the Books Returns machine in the library and knowing it will be at least a month before I need to bury my head in them again. Seeing other students furiously scribbling away and revising for their upcoming exams when I have already finished makes me feel just a bit guilty but mostly relieved that I am no longer in their situation.

10 ) Enjoy the sun: Not that the sun likes to wait around till after my exams are finished. (Just look at the weather now- all dull and wet compared to the bright sunny skies we had approximately two weeks ago)! When it does come back though, I shall thoroughly enjoy eating ice cream and soaking up the sun without a textbook or any revision notes in sight!

 

source: studentblogs.le.ac.uk

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7 Benefits Οf Technology Integration Ιn Τhe Education Sphere

7 Benefits Οf Technology Integration Ιn Τhe Education Sphere

The future of the educational system is practically determined by the development of technology. Some educators and experts are against the trends of implementing EdTech tools and apps in every single aspect of the schooling system, mainly because technology is a source of distraction for students. However, proper technology integration guides students towards greater understanding of all concepts covered in class.

Advantages Οf Technology Integration Ιn Τhe Education Sphere

The teaching strategies based on educational technology can be described as ethical practices that facilitate the students’ learning and boost their capacity, productivity, and performance. Technology integration in education inspires positive changes in teaching methods on an international level. Are you still wondering whether or not you should start relying on different apps and tools? The following list of benefits will help you come to a final conclusion.

1. Technology makes teaching easy! 

Aren’t you tired of giving theoretical explanations your students cannot understand? You simply cannot discover a way of presenting tough concepts that makes the concept clear for each and every student in the class. Technology has that power! Thanks to audio-visual presentations, your students will understand exactly how the knowledge is applied in practice. You can use projectors and computer presentations to deliver any type of lesson or instruction and improve the level of comprehension within the class.

2. Technology helps you track students’ progress!

You are no longer limited to a plain-old diary and notes about every student. That would only get you confused. Today, you can rely on platforms and tools that enable you to keep track of the individual achievements of your students. MyStudentsProgress and theTeacherCloud Progress Tracker are great online tools that enable you to do that, but your school can also develop personalized software that would serve that purpose.

3. Educational technology is good to the environment!

Can you imagine the amount of paper and number of trees that would be saved if every school decided to introduce digital textbooks? Of course, that goal is far from realistic at this point, but you can make a change when you start from your own class. For example, you can instruct your students to take online tests and submit their papers and homework through email. You can also encourage them to use eReaders to go through the literature you assign.

4. Thanks to technology, students enjoy learning! 

Students are addicted to Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, Digg, and other websites from a very early age. The internet can distract them from the learning process, but you can also use their inclination to spend time online for a good purpose: Making learning enjoyable. Use touch-screen technology and online presentations to make the classes more interactive. You can also rely on technology when you want your students to take part in discussions. Set up a private Facebook group for your class and inspire constructive conversations!

5. Technology makes distance learning more accessible than ever! 

Without the wonders of the internet, people wouldn’t be able to get access to any type of information at the very moment they think of it. Today, distance learning is one of the most trending learning methods. Virtual lessons are slowly taking the place of traditional lectures. Students can organize their time in a way that works for them, and they can easily gain the knowledge they are interested in. For example, let’s say one of your students shows great interest in Astronomy, but the traditional curriculum does nothing to feed that hunger for knowledge. You can recommend him/her to take beginner’s course at Coursera, Udemy, or any other online service that offers high-quality virtual lectures.

6. Students and teachers can access information at any time!

This is possibly the most obvious benefit of technology. When old-school teachers were students, they had to spend hours in the library looking for the information they needed. Today, technology integration makes everything different and simpler. Students can easily access newspapers, scientific articles, studies, and any other type of content online. They can write better, deeper academic papers because they can support their arguments with more evidence. When you give a lecture the students don’t understand, they can find simpler instructions and information with a single Google search.

7. Technology makes collaboration more effective! 

Think about the way collaboration looks like in a traditional classroom setting. You organize groups, assign the projects, and suddenly the class becomes a complete mess. Some students express their opinions too loudly and firmly, while others don’t get an opportunity to be heard. Online tools and apps offer a unique setting for students to engage in a group project. They can do the work from home; the team is connected through the Internet and everyone is inspired by the focused environment.

Don’t Underestimate The Power Of Technology

You stand no chance of being called “the cool teacher” if you keep neglecting the use of educational technology in the classroom. The benefits of technology integration described above should convince you of the fact that this form education is great for both students and teachers.

 

source: elearningindustry.com

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Intsikizi Tapestries – Art Exhibition

Intsikizi Tapestries – Art Exhibition

IS Art Gallery hosts an exhibition of the Intsikizi Tapestries from the Keiskamma Art project during the Franschhoek Literary Festival. The six piece set of the exhibition shows the hunt for the endangered Southern Ground Hornbill (Intsikizi) and focuses on the natural environment. Using the style, composition and content of the famous European artwork “The hunt for the Unicorn” as a starting point, the theme follows in a Xhosa context showing a Xhosa traditional hunt with dogs for the ground hornbill. In the South African context Xhosa dogs are often trained to hunt by hunting the ground hornbill as it is slow to fly, and is associated with rain making, so is hunted in time of drought. It is now endangered and the hope from this work is to engage in a deeper understanding of nature and its meaning in Xhosa life, thus helping to restore traditional values of respect and awe of the natural world.

The Keiskamma Art Project provides opportunities to over a hundred people in the tiny Eastern Cape settlement of Hamburg to support themselves and their families. Members of this project are best known for the “compelling and exquisite” large-scale artworks they make collaboratively, which include embroidery and needlework.

Venue: Ilse Schermers Art Gallery, 11 Huguenot St, Franschhoek
Time: Mon to Fri 9am to 5pm | Sat & Sun 10am to 5pm
Cost: Free

Tel: 021 876 2071
Email: gallery@isart.co.za
Website: keiskamma.com
Facebook: The Keiskamma Trust
Twitter: keiskammatrust

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11 Facts about English I bet you did not know

11 Facts about English I bet you did not know

1. English is the language of the skies

You might know that English is the language of many lands (it’s the official language of 67 countries) but did you know it’s the language of the skies, too? That’s right, English is spoken by all pilots to identify themselves on flights, regardless of where they are from – yet another way in which learning English improves employability, to join our examples in tourism and multinational companies.

2. You or me?

We use the words ‘you’ and ‘me’ all the time, but which of the two do you think is the most widely used? You might be surprised to learn that while ‘you’ is the 18th most commonly used word in the English language; ‘me’ is way back at number 50. So what is the most used English word? Exactly that: ‘the’.

3. One in a billion!

If you were to write out every number in order as words (e.g. one, two, three, four…) you wouldn’t use the letter ‘b’ until you reached one billion!

4. No repeats!

‘Subdermatoglyphic’ is the longest English word that can be written without repeating any letters. It has 17 letters in it, and it’s the medical name for the layer of skin beneath the fingertips. Slightly easier to guess the meaning of is the word ‘uncopyrightable’, which has 15 letters without any being repeated, and refers to something that can’t be copyrighted or owned.

5. Shakespeare was an architect of the English language

The legendary playwright was responsible for many of the things we say and write today. These include the words ‘fashionable’, ‘advertising’ and ‘laughable’, and the phrase ‘fight fire with fire’, which means to respond to attack with a similar form of attack.

6. New arrivals to the dictionary

A new word is added to the dictionary every two hours. The newest and strangest include ‘nerdjacking’ (to hijack a conversation with detailed explanations), ‘undorse’ (to reverse a policy) and ‘Mx’ (a gender-neutral form of address instead of using Mr or Ms).

7. Same word, different meanings

You may know a ‘twerk’ to be a popular, thrusting dance but in the 16th century ‘twirk’ (spelt with an ‘i’ not an ‘e’) meant ‘to twist the hairs of a moustache’. Speaking of twerking, here’s a selection of some of our favourite modern words and slang terms you should know.

8. The origins of English

English originates from Old English, which is its earliest historical form from the 5th century. There was no punctuation until the 15th century. The oldest Old English word still used today that has the same direct meaning is ‘town’. Town has kept the same meaning as its original Old English word “tun” meaning area of dwelling.

9. Time to move

‘Go.’ is the shortest grammatically correct sentence in English.

10. The enemies of poets

There are no words in English that rhyme perfectly with ‘month’, ‘orange’, ‘silver’ or ‘purple’. The definition of a ‘perfect rhyme’ can be found here.

11. What’s an ‘aegilops’?!

The longest word in English with its letters in alphabetical order is ‘aegilops’, which is a type of plant.

Credit: english.com

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